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Utrecht

Netherlands

Our Dutch offices are located in Utrecht and Amsterdam. At CMS Netherlands, 160 lawyers, notaries and tax advisers form a full service practice. Our clients vary from medium and large enterprises to multinationals.

We advise them on legal and tax issues and have extensive knowledge of all big industries. We gladly facilitate our clients in following their ambitions. We always make sure that we are up-to-date on market changes and legislative changes and provide you with clear, concrete advice.

CMS has a longstanding tradition as a legal services provider in the Dutch market. Our Dutch office was founded in 1900. Nine year later we brought our international aspirations into practice when we entered into an alliance with four other renowned European firms: CMS was born. Currently, CMS has 75 offices in 43 countries  and is one of the leading law firms in the world. We know everything about the Dutch business climate and are actively involved in several networks for social responsibility.

Laws and regulations are becoming more and more complex. Companies have limited certainties on future legal developments and legal issues are complicated and comprehensive. Advising on these legal issues is CMS’s core business. But CMS aims to facilitate and work together with its clients in a broader sense. An example is that we maintain close relations with scientists and research institutions. Together we study complex issues that our clients have to deal with. In addition, we stimulate our clients to anticipate long term developments, in order to be future proof.

We share our knowledge and experience without any obligations on our website. If you are interested in the services that we offer, please visit our Online Services Platform.
 

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Directions

By car
Amsterdam
A2 direction Utrecht, A12 direction Arnhem, A27 direction Hilversum and take exit Rijnsweerd. See map for further directions.

Den Haag
A12 direction Arnhem. See map for further directions.

Breda and 's Hertogenbosch
A27 direction Hilversum. See map for further directions.

Hilversum
A27 direction Breda, take exit Rijnsweerd and see map for further directions.

Arnhem
A12 direction Utrecht, A27 direction Hilversum and see map for further directions.

Amersfoort
A28 direction Utrecht, straight on at junction Rijnsweerd and see map for further directions.

By train
Take the train to Utrecht Central Station. From here take bus 28 direction Rijnsweerd/Uithof, get off at stop ‘Rijnsweerd Noord’ and cross the street, take a 2 minutes walk to the right to our office at 'Newtonlaan 203'.

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Location

CMS
Newtonlaan 203
3584 BH Utrecht
PO Box 85250
3508 AG Utrecht
Netherlands
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March 2019
CMS European M&A Study 2019
The CMS Cor­por­ate/M&A group is pleased to launch the el­ev­enth edi­tion of our European M&A Study. This year’s Study re­flects data from 458 deals in 2018 on which CMS ad­vised. This is the largest num­ber...
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April 2019
CMS Soil and Ground­wa­ter Con­tam­in­a­tion Guide
From the 1970s on­wards, soil and ground­wa­ter con­tam­in­a­tion has be­come an in­creas­ingly im­port­ant reg­u­lat­ory is­sue. However, there are still no uni­form reg­u­la­tions. Nu­mer­ous sets of rules have been de­veloped...

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06 April 2021
EU is­sues draft of Di­git­al Mar­kets Act aimed at cre­at­ing a new and fair...
The European Com­mis­sion has pub­lished a draft pro­pos­al for a new com­pet­i­tion law frame­work for large on­line plat­forms, called the Di­git­al Mar­kets Act (DMA). The Com­mis­sion pro­posed the DMA due to the...
01 April 2021
Di­git­al Mar­kets Act: a new and fair busi­ness frame­work for large plat­forms
The European Com­mis­sion has pub­lished the draft pro­pos­al for a new com­pet­i­tion law frame­work for large on­line plat­forms, called the Di­git­al Mar­kets Act (the “DMA”). The reas­on the Com­mis­sion pro­posed the DMA is that a small num­ber of large on­line plat­forms cap­ture the biggest share of over­all value gen­er­ated in Europe’s di­git­al eco­nomy, and these plat­forms have emerged by be­ne­fit­ting from sec­tor char­ac­ter­ist­ics such as strong net­work ef­fects, of­ten em­bed­ded in their own plat­form eco­sys­tems. These plat­forms rep­res­ent the key struc­tur­ing ele­ments in today’s di­git­al eco­nomy, in­ter­me­di­at­ing the ma­jor­ity of trans­ac­tions between end users and busi­ness users. A few large plat­forms in­creas­ingly act as gate­ways or gate­keep­ers between busi­ness users and end users, and en­joy a long-term, en­trenched po­s­i­tion, of­ten as a res­ult of the cre­ation of con­glom­er­ate eco­sys­tems around their core plat­form ser­vices, which re­in­forces ex­ist­ing entry bar­ri­ers.The DMA deals with those large on­line plat­forms act­ing as gate­keep­ers in di­git­al mar­kets. The DMA aims to en­sure that:these plat­forms be­have fairly on­line;in­nov­at­ors and tech­no­logy start-ups will have new op­por­tun­it­ies to com­pete and in­nov­ate in the on­line plat­form en­vir­on­ment without hav­ing to com­ply with un­fair terms and con­di­tions that lim­it their de­vel­op­ment;con­sumers will have more and bet­ter ser­vices to choose from, more op­por­tun­it­ies to switch their pro­vider if they so wish, dir­ect ac­cess to ser­vices, and fairer prices. Who are the gate­keep­ers? Gate­keep­ers are core plat­form ser­vices which meet the qual­it­at­ive and quant­it­at­ive cri­ter­ia set out in the DMA. Core plat­form ser­vices in­clude on­line in­ter­me­di­ation ser­vices, search en­gines, so­cial net­work­ing ser­vices, video-shar­ing plat­form ser­vices, num­ber-in­de­pend­ent in­ter­per­son­al com­mu­nic­a­tion ser­vices, op­er­at­ing sys­tems, cloud com­put­ing ser­vices, ad­vert­ising ser­vices in­clud­ing any ad­vert­ising net­works, ad­vert­ising ex­changes and any oth­er ad­vert­ising in­ter­me­di­ation ser­vices, provided by a pro­vider of any of the core plat­form ser­vices lis­ted above.A core plat­form ser­vice qual­i­fies as a gate­keep­er, if:it has a sig­ni­fic­ant im­pact on the in­tern­al mar­ket, which is pre­sumed if it achieves an an­nu­al EEA turnover equal to or above EUR 6.5 bil­lion in the three pre­ced­ing fin­an­cial years, or where the av­er­age mar­ket cap­it­al­isa­tion or the equi­val­ent fair mar­ket value of the un­der­tak­ing to which it be­longs amoun­ted to at least EUR 65 bil­lion in the pre­ced­ing fin­an­cial year, and it provides a core plat­form ser­vice in at least three Mem­ber States;it op­er­ates a core plat­form ser­vice which serves as an im­port­ant gate­way for busi­ness users to reach end users, which is pre­sumed if it has more than 45 mil­lion monthly act­ive end users es­tab­lished or loc­ated in the Uni­on and more than 10,000 yearly act­ive busi­ness users es­tab­lished in the EU in the pre­ced­ing fin­an­cial year;it en­joys a long-term, en­trenched po­s­i­tion in its op­er­a­tions or it is fore­see­able that it will en­joy such po­s­i­tion in the near fu­ture, which is pre­sumed if the thresholds in point b) were met in each of the three pre­ced­ing fin­an­cial years.   What are the gate­keep­ers’ main ob­lig­a­tions? Do’s and Don’ts     What kind of tools and powers do the Com­mis­sion and oth­er bod­ies have? The DMA grants powers and dif­fer­ent pro­ced­ur­al rights to the European Com­mis­sion and es­tab­lishes the Di­git­al Mar­kets Ad­vis­ory Com­mit­tee for is­su­ing opin­ions in is­sues re­lated to the DMA.The DMA gives the Com­mis­sion the fol­low­ing powers:to des­ig­nate core plat­form ser­vices that meet the DMA cri­ter­ia as gate­keep­ers;to re­view ad-hoc the status of gate­keep­ers on re­quest or on its own;to re­view at two-year in­ter­vals the status of gate­keep­ers;to spe­cify meas­ures to be taken by gate­keep­er to com­ply with the DMA;to sus­pend cer­tain gate­keep­er ob­lig­a­tions un­der the DMA at a gate­keep­er’s re­quest, if the gate­keep­er demon­strates that com­pli­ance with that spe­cif­ic ob­lig­a­tion would en­danger its eco­nom­ic vi­ab­il­ity;to ex­empt a gate­keep­er from cer­tain ob­lig­a­tions un­der the DMA on the grounds of pub­lic mor­al­ity, pub­lic health or pub­lic se­cur­ity;to ini­ti­ate mar­ket in­vest­ig­a­tions:lower-ro­manto ex­am­ine wheth­er a pro­vider of core plat­form ser­vices should be des­ig­nated as a gate­keep­er;in­to sys­tem­at­ic non-com­pli­ance by a gate­keep­er;to ex­am­ine wheth­er cer­tain ser­vices in the di­git­al sec­tor should be ad­ded to the list of core plat­form ser­vices and identi­fy prac­tices that might lim­it the con­test­abil­ity of core plat­form ser­vices or might be un­fair.The DMA grants in­vest­ig­at­ive, en­force­ment and mon­it­or­ing powers to the Com­mis­sion dur­ing its pro­ceed­ings, based on which the Com­mis­sion is en­titled to:re­quest in­form­a­tion from any un­der­tak­ings and from the gov­ern­ments and au­thor­it­ies of EU mem­ber states;ac­cess data bases and al­gorithms;in­ter­view any private per­son or leg­al en­tity to col­lect in­form­a­tion re­lat­ing to the sub­ject-mat­ter of an in­vest­ig­a­tion;con­duct on-site in­spec­tions at the premises of any un­der­tak­ings, in­clud­ing to­geth­er with aud­it­ors and ex­perts;or­der in­ter­im meas­ures against a gate­keep­er on the basis of a prima facie find­ing of an in­fringe­ment of ob­lig­a­tions un­der the DMA;mon­it­or the ef­fect­ive im­ple­ment­a­tion and com­pli­ance with the ob­lig­a­tions un­der the DMA.   What will the sanc­tions for non-com­pli­ance be? If the Com­mis­sion ad­opts a non-com­pli­ance de­cision in which it finds that a gate­keep­er does not com­ply with one or more ob­lig­a­tions un­der the DMA, the Com­mis­sion may fine a gate­keep­er.The max­im­um amount of a fine is 10% of the total world­wide an­nu­al turnover of the gate­keep­er in the case of a ma­ter­i­al breach of the ob­lig­a­tions un­der the DMA, and a max­im­um 1% in the case of a less ser­i­ous breach of ob­lig­a­tions un­der the DMA.The Com­mis­sion is also en­titled to or­der peri­od­ic pen­alty pay­ments of up to 5% of the av­er­age daily turnover in cer­tain cases defined in the DMA.In the case of sys­tem­at­ic breaches of the DMA ob­lig­a­tions by gate­keep­ers, ad­di­tion­al rem­ed­ies may be im­posed after a mar­ket in­vest­ig­a­tion. Such rem­ed­ies will need to be pro­por­tion­ate to the of­fence com­mit­ted. If ne­ces­sary and as a last re­sort, non-fin­an­cial rem­ed­ies can be im­posed. These can in­clude be­ha­vi­our­al and struc­tur­al rem­ed­ies, e.g. the di­vestit­ure of (parts of) a busi­ness.   What are the next steps? The European Par­lia­ment and Mem­ber States will dis­cuss the Com­mis­sion’s pro­pos­al ac­cord­ing to the or­din­ary le­gis­lat­ive pro­ced­ure, which will take at least 18 months. Once ad­op­ted, the Act will dir­ectly ap­ply across the EU and the core plat­form ser­vice pro­viders will have six months to pre­pare for the new leg­al re­gime.We will con­tinu­ously mon­it­or the status of the le­gis­lat­ive pro­cess and keep you up­dated on any changes to the draft text of the DMA.
29 March 2021
Fa­cing the fu­ture of in­ter­na­tion­al ar­bit­ra­tion
New pod­cast series ex­plor­ing the evolving chal­lenges and in­nov­a­tions of in­ter­na­tion­al ar­bit­ra­tion by the mem­bers of the CMS In­ter­na­tion­al Ar­bit­ra­tion Group
29 March 2021
EDPS & EDPB re­lease joint opin­ion on the Data Gov­ernance Act
On 10 March 2021, the EDPB and the EDPS re­leased their joint opin­ion on the Data Gov­ernance Act (DGA), the European Com­mis­sion’s Pro­pos­al for a Reg­u­la­tion on European data gov­ernance. The DGA is an...
26 March 2021
Oil & Gas / Ship­ping – The Ever Giv­en
The Suez Canal opened in 1869. Along with the Panama Canal, it is one of the most im­port­ant mari­time “short­cuts” ever built. Today, the canal is 193km (120 miles) long and is one of the busiest wa­ter­ways...
24 March 2021
European M&A en­vir­on­ment flips to ‘buy­er-friendly’ in re­sponse to COV­ID-19
Europe has re­turned to a ‘buy­er-friendly’ en­vir­on­ment, after the COV­ID-19 pan­dem­ic cre­ated more risk-averse at­ti­tudes. As a res­ult, CMS’s latest an­nu­al M&A study iden­ti­fied a sig­ni­fic­ant in­crease...
24 March 2021
CMS Ex­pert Guide to European care homes
The world is get­ting older by the minute.Ac­cord­ing to the the 2021 Age­ing Re­port of the EU, the old-age de­pend­ency ra­tio in the EU’s demo­graph­ic old-age de­pend­ency ra­tio (i.e. the ra­tio between people...
Comparable
24 March 2021
CMS European M&A Study 2021
The CMS Cor­por­ate/M&A Group is pleased to launch the thir­teenth edi­tion of the European M&A Study
24 March 2021
EDPB Guidelines on Vir­tu­al Voice As­sist­ants
The European Data Pro­tec­tion Board (EDPB) pub­lished its draft Guidelines 02/2021 on Vir­tu­al Voice As­sist­ants (VVAs), which are soft­ware ser­vices that take voice as an in­put, identi­fy and ex­ecute a com­mand...
23 March 2021
On the Pulse
Wel­come to ‘On the Pulse’ de­livered by the Glob­al Life Sci­ences & Health­care Sec­tor Group A video/pod­cast series, On the Pulse, brings to­geth­er CMS law­yers and ex­perts to dis­cuss key in­dustry top­ics...
23 March 2021
COV­ID-19: the European Com­mis­sion au­thor­izes a Finnish aid to com­pensate...
On 12 March 2021, the European Com­mis­sion has ap­proved an aid meas­ure of EUR 351.38 mil­lion to com­pensate for the dam­age suffered by Fin­nair as a res­ult of the meas­ures taken by Fin­land, the EU and oth­er...
23 March 2021
The En­larged Board of the European Pat­ent Of­fice has giv­en a mo­ment­ous...
The En­larged Board of the European Pat­ent Of­fice heard or­al ar­gu­ments in Ju­ly 2020 con­cern­ing pat­entab­il­ity of a com­puter soft­ware in­ven­tion.  This rare event was video streamed to over 1600 pat­ent stake­hold­ers...