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Portrait of Dunja Jandl

Dunja Jandl

Partner

CMS Reich-Rohrwig Hainz
Bleiweisova 30
1000 Ljubljana
Slovenia
Languages Slovenian, German, English

Dunja Jandl is a legal practitioner with more than ten years of work experience who joined CMS Slovenia as a partner in February 2017.

She supports real estate companies and investors in their real estate transactions, acting on both the seller’s and the buyer’s side. She also offers ongoing advice to clients to ensure the successful management of their assets. In recent years, Dunja Jandl has been the lead adviser in a number of large real estate development and transaction projects in Slovenia. Furthermore, she works with clients on project developments, supporting them during the construction phase and also advising them on project financing. Dunja Jandl’s expertise also covers PPPs and public procurement matters.

As a very experienced litigator, she also represents her clients, who come from a variety of sectors, especially retail, energy and hotel & leisure, in court as well as in alternative dispute resolution proceedings, acting as counsel, mediator and arbitrator.

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The ‘exemplary’ Dunja Jandl,…

Legal 500, Market overview, 2018

Memberships & Roles

  • Bar Association of Slovenia
  • Slovenian Association of Mediators
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Education

  • 20xx - Mediator’s licence, Republic of Slovenia, Ministry of Justice
  • 200x - State bar examination, Republic of Slovenia, Ministry of Justice
  • 2005 - Master of Laws, LMU Munich
  • 2004 - Bachelor of Laws, University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Law
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25/11/2022
En­ergy Sav­ings Guide
This CMS Guide is de­signed to shine a light on the wide vari­ety of en­ergy sav­ing laws in se­lec­ted CEE coun­tries by ex­plain­ing the most im­port­ant leg­al meas­ures and help­ing you to dis­cov­er where your op­por­tun­it­ies might lie. Polit­ic­al and leg­al frame­work En­ergy trans­form­a­tion re­quires build­ing up new en­ergy sources and that takes time. Sav­ing en­ergy, how­ever, is the quick­est and cheapest way to ad­dress the cur­rent en­ergy crisis, which is mainly caused by Rus­sia’s in­va­sion of Ukraine. Re­du­cing en­ergy con­sump­tion cuts house­holds’ and com­pan­ies’ high en­ergy bills.Build­ing on the “Fit for 55” pack­age of pro­pos­als and com­plet­ing the ac­tions on en­ergy se­cur­ity of sup­ply and stor­age, the European Com­mis­sion’s RE­PowerEU plan put for­ward a set of five ac­tions, the first of which is en­ergy sav­ing. Uni­on law sets forth man­dat­ory sav­ing goals for Mem­ber States but leaves them plenty of lee­way to choose between a vari­ety of meas­ures. Ap­plic­ant coun­tries and many oth­ers have passed en­ergy sav­ings laws and tar­gets too – of­fer­ing ad­di­tion­al flex­ib­il­ity.As a frame­work, the Fit for 55 pack­age and the European Cli­mate Law (REG 2021/1119) sets out a bind­ing, ir­re­vers­ible re­duc­tion of an­thro­po­gen­ic emis­sions. By 2030, 55% of the net GHG (green­house gas) emis­sions com­pared to 1990 must be saved. By 2050, the man­dat­ory net zero emis­sion goal must be achieved.Reg­u­la­tion 2022/1032 re­quires that mem­ber states fill their gas stor­age fa­cil­it­ies to at least 80-90% or that they store at least 35% of their av­er­age an­nu­al con­sump­tion in European stor­age fa­cil­it­ies. Re­du­cing con­sump­tion over the years re­duces the filling ob­lig­a­tion.Since Au­gust 2022, ob­lig­at­ory re­duc­tions in gas con­sump­tion ap­ply to EU mem­ber states (Reg­u­la­tion 2022/1032). The core in­nov­a­tion of this re­gime is the Uni­on alarm that can be triggered by the European Coun­cil if there is a ma­ter­i­al risk of grave gas sup­ply short­ages, ex­traordin­ary gas de­mand or a na­tion­al alarm pur­su­ant to Dir­ect­ive 2017/1938 in at least five Mem­ber States. Once a Uni­on alarm has been triggered and for as long as it re­mains in force, mem­ber states must re­duce their gas con­sump­tion by 15%. There is a par­tial ex­cep­tion if this would oth­er­wise cause an elec­tri­city crisis in the re­spect­ive mem­ber state. However, the steer­ing meas­ures to be taken and wheth­er cer­tain groups of gas con­sumers are gran­ted more fa­vour­able con­di­tions re­main at the mem­ber state’s dis­cre­tion. Re­gard­ing elec­tri­city, Reg­u­la­tion 2022/1854 on an emer­gency in­ter­ven­tion to ad­dress high en­ergy prices aims to re­duce elec­tri­city con­sump­tion by 10% and ease the pres­sure on elec­tri­city prices through rev­en­ue caps. Again, Mem­ber States are free to choose the ap­pro­pri­ate meas­ures to re­duce gross elec­tri­city con­sump­tion and meet the 10% tar­get.Ad­di­tion­al rules ap­ply to the fuel con­sump­tion of trucks or the en­ergy con­sump­tion of dis­trict heat­ing/cool­ing. The CMS Guide The res­ult of these reg­u­la­tions con­cern­ing en­ergy sav­ing has been the in­tro­duc­tion of a wide vari­ety of en­ergy sav­ing laws in in­di­vidu­al states; and many more meas­ures are still to come. This CMS Guide is de­signed to shine a light on these reg­u­la­tions by ex­plain­ing the most im­port­ant leg­al meas­ures and help­ing you to dis­cov­er where your op­por­tun­it­ies might lie. For each jur­is­dic­tion, the guide is struc­tured in­to: (1) a coun­try over­view,  (2) na­tion­al re­lief meas­ures for high en­ergy prices,  (3) na­tion­al/re­gion­al/com­mun­al en­ergy sav­ings meas­ures, and  (4) en­ergy stor­age status and in­cent­ives.The fol­low­ing meas­ures have been chosen by the states rep­res­en­ted in this  guide:  sub­sidies to end-con­sumers (Aus­tria in gen­er­al for en­ergy prices; Croa­tia for gas con­sump­tion), price caps: elec­tri­city (Croa­tia for house­holds, un­der­tak­ings and cer­tain­pub­lic con­sumers; Ukraine for house­holds),re­duced VAT rate (Croa­tia, North Mace­do­nia), tax in­cent­ives to privately store gas (Ukraine); ex­emp­tion from steer­ing meas­ures for privately stor­ing gas (Aus­tria),sub­sidies to com­pensate for high en­ergy prices (Bul­garia and Slov­akia, in Slov­e­nia for en­ter­prises, in Türki­ye for ag­ri­cul­ture) and en­ergy sav­ing meas­ures: (Croa­tia for SMEs); the real­loc­a­tion of EU funds to sup­port en­ergy con­sumers (Slov­akia); sub­sidies for en­ergy stor­age solu­tions (Aus­tria, Bul­garia and Ukraine) or for heat pro­du­cers (Ukraine),en­ergy ef­fi­ciency meas­ures in­cl. di­git­al­isa­tion (Bul­garia),re­duced hours of elec­tri­city or heat­ing sup­ply (North Mace­do­nia) or of gas sup­ply (Slov­akia),re­duc­tion of en­ergy con­sump­tion by the pub­lic ad­min­is­tra­tion (Aus­tria, North Mace­do­nia, Slov­e­nia), an­dob­lig­a­tions on gas stor­age op­er­at­ors to feed gas in­to the grid (Aus­tria, Slov­akia) or to sup­ply heat pro­du­cers at pref­er­en­tial prices (Ukraine).re­wards for vol­un­tary re­duc­tion of gas and/or elec­tric en­ergy con­sump­tion (Slov­e­nia)educed per­mit­ting re­quire­ments for PV and wind plants (Türki­ye).
04/08/2022
In­ter­na­tion­al ar­bit­ra­tion law and rules in Slov­e­nia
Ar­bit­ra­tion is a well-es­tab­lished op­tion for resolv­ing dis­putes in Slov­e­nia and we have no­ticed an in­crease in the num­ber of dis­putes re­solved by ar­bit­ra­tion in re­cent years. However, court lit­ig­a­tion...
24/02/2022
Pro­spects for in­stall­a­tion and util­iz­a­tion of rooftop sol­ar photo­vol­ta­ics...
CMS Guide
09/02/2022
Class ac­tions in Slov­e­nia
See the Over­view of the Rep­res­ent­at­ive Ac­tions Dir­ect­ive >> 1. Do you have a spe­cif­ic pro­ced­ure or pro­ced­ures for bring­ing “opt-in” class ac­tions?  If so, please out­line such pro­ced­ure(s) and...
Comparable
17/09/2021
Vac­cine com­pens­a­tion re­gimes in Slov­e­nia
1. Are COV­ID-19 vac­cin­a­tions ob­lig­at­ory in your jur­is­dic­tion? Are you ex­pect­ing any le­gis­lat­ive changes to en­able man­dat­ory vac­cines for all or cer­tain people (e.g. health­care pro­fes­sion­als, pub­lic ser­vants...
Comparable
01/09/2021
Slov­e­nia: Com­mer­cial Leases in the Grip of the COV­ID-19 Epi­dem­ic
Pub­lished on ceeleg­al­mat­ters.comThe COV­ID-19 epi­dem­ic and con­sequent re­strict­ive meas­ures strongly af­fected Slov­e­nia’s eco­nomy, in­clud­ing the coun­try’s rent­al mar­ket. The COV­ID-19 epi­dem­ic im­pacted all com­mer­cial leases, with tour­ism, hos­pit­al­ity, and to an ex­tent re­tail among the sec­tors suf­fer­ing most. Com­mer­cial prop­er­ties with strong ten­ants such as IT & Life Sci­ence com­pan­ies and pub­lic sec­tor en­tit­ies proved to be much more re­si­li­ent than com­mer­cial prop­er­ties de­pend­ent on ten­ants from dis­tressed sec­tors.
21/04/2021
Real es­tate trans­ac­tion costs and taxes in Slov­e­nia
1. Due di­li­gence costs for the pur­chase of real es­tate 1.1 Mu­ni­cip­al search Cost No charge for on­line search. Land use cer­ti­fic­ate: EUR 22.70Site plan in­form­a­tion: EUR 22.70 VAT Nil 1.2 Util­ity search...
15/04/2021
Law and reg­u­la­tion of con­sequen­tial dam­ages clauses in the en­ergy sec­tor...
1. Do the words “con­sequen­tial loss” have a giv­en mean­ing in law? No, the words “con­sequen­tial loss” do not have a giv­en mean­ing in Slov­e­ni­an law. The Slov­e­ni­an Ob­lig­a­tions Code (Ob­liga­cijski...
24/03/2021
CMS Ex­pert Guide to European care homes
The world is get­ting older by the minute.Ac­cord­ing to the the 2021 Age­ing Re­port of the EU, the old-age de­pend­ency ra­tio in the EU’s demo­graph­ic old-age de­pend­ency ra­tio (i.e. the ra­tio between people...
Comparable
01/04/2021
CMS CEE Ger­man Desk: Waste man­age­ment in Cent­ral and East­ern Europe
As ever more waste is pro­duced, many coun­tries face new chal­lenges:What are the cur­rent de­vel­op­ments in the CEE coun­tries?How does waste man­age­ment dif­fer between EU and non-EU coun­tries?What prob­lem-solv­ing...
22/03/2021
CMS made it to the Ar­bit­ra­tion Power­l­ist 2021 of Leg­al500
The Ar­bit­ra­tion Power­l­ist: Cent­ral and East­ern Europe show­cases the lead­ing prac­ti­tion­ers work­ing in a broad sweep of coun­tries, stretch­ing from Aus­tria and Po­land to the Balt­ic Na­tions and down to Ser­bia...
18/12/2020
Re­new­able en­ergy law and reg­u­la­tion in Slov­e­nia
1. Brief over­view of the re­new­ables sec­tor While the of­fi­cial fig­ures are not yet avail­able, it seems un­likely that Slov­e­nia will have achieved a 25% share of re­new­able en­ergy in gross fi­nal en­ergy con­sump­tion...