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Portrait ofDragana Bajić , CMS-Serbia

Dragana Bajić

Partner

Contact
Petrikić & Partneri AOD
in cooperation with CMS Reich-Rohrwig Hainz
Krunska 73
11000 Belgrade
Serbia
Languages Serbian, English, German
Employment & Pensions

Expertise

Dragana Bajić has more than 19 years of experience in employment law matters and she heads CMS employment teams in Serbia, Montenegro and North Macedonia. Her experience ranges from drafting of individual employment and management contracts and various employment related policies, to collective bargaining negotiations, individual dismissals, complex restructuring of workforce and mass lay-offs. She also assisted a number of clients in the process of implementation of the internal whistleblowing procedure, as well as in sensitive investigations in relation to alleged harassment at work.

For the last several years, she has also been acting as the Chair (and previously as Vicechair) of the Labour Regulations Committee of AmCham Serbia, where she is leading the efforts of more than 100 companies that are members of this Committee to improve labour regulations in Serbia.

Previous work experience / training  

Before joining CMS in May 2021, Dragana Bajić worked for several reputable international law firms in Belgrade, where she headed their employment law practice and coordinated regional projects for international clients.

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“Dragana Bajić is very thorough and detailed. All enquiries are resolved promptly. In addition, she demonstrates solid business understanding of clients’ actual needs, with proposals on how to mitigate risks, if any.”

The Legal 500 EMEA, 2023

“Dragana Bajić is knowledgable and reliable, and with a positive approach and exceptional communication skills.”

The Legal 500 EMEA, 2023

“Dragana Bajić is knowledgable and reliable, and with a positive approach and exceptional communication skills.”

The Legal 500 EMEA, 2023

“Dragana Bajić is very thorough and detailed. All enquiries are resolved promptly. In addition, she demonstrates solid business understanding of clients’ actual needs, with proposals on how to mitigate risks, if any.”

The Legal 500 EMEA, 2023

“Dragana Bajić’s dedication, in-depth expertise, and innovative mindset make her an invaluable resource. She’s not just a legal advisor but a strategic partner, who is always focused on finding practical solutions.”

The Legal 500 EMEA, 2024

"Dragana Bajić is a fantastic professional, with a deep understanding not only of the Serbian legal framework but also of business practices. Apart from her legal and business knowledge, she is a real pleasure to work with.”

The Legal 500 EMEA, 2022

“Dragana Bajić’s work brings efficiency and clarity to complex employment matters, and clients highly appreciate her contributions to their activities.”

The Legal 500 EMEA, 2024

“Dragana Bajić proved to have a great understanding of our needs, and dedicated time to understanding all aspects in order to provide the most suitable advice.”

The Legal 500 EMEA, 2022

"Among 50 Women Leaders in employment law"

International Employment Lawyer, 2022

“Dragana Bajić’s commitment to resolving labour policy issues and advancing the digitalisation of labour documentation sets her apart from competitors.”

The Legal 500 EMEA, 2024

“Dragana is always very helpful in providing us with clear guidance on employment law issues. She is responsive and thorough and successfully settles a variety of matters in an efficient and cost-effective manner.”

Employment client, Chambers Europe 2024

Memberships & Roles

  • 2019 – Chair of Labour Regulations Committee, AmCham Serbia (to date)
  • 2018 – Vice Chair of Labour Regulations Committee, AmCham Serbia
  • 2007 – Admitted to the Serbian Bar Association as attorney (to date)
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Education

  • 2007  – Bar exam
  • 2004 - University of Belgrade, Faculty of Law, LL.B. 
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Data Protection Law

Dragana Bajić has more than 12 years of experience in personal data protection matters and she heads CMS data protection teams in Serbia, Montenegro and North Macedonia.

Dragana Bajić's considerable experience includes drafting of privacy policies and data subject’s consent forms, as well as drafting of data processing and transfer agreements. She also worked on the data protection aspect of various fintech projects. Her most recent experience includes working on several complex projects of assessment of adequacy of the Serbian legal framework as a whole, in the context of the “post-Schrems II” transfer of personal data from EU countries to Serbia.

Before joining CMS in May 2021, Dragana Bajić headed the data protection team of a reputable international law firm in Belgrade.

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“Dragana is always very helpful in providing us with clear guidance on employment law issues. She is responsive and thorough and successfully settles a variety of matters in an efficient and cost-effective manner.”

Employment client, Chambers Europe 2024

“Dragana Bajić’s dedication, in-depth expertise, and innovative mindset make her an invaluable resource. She’s not just a legal advisor but a strategic partner, who is always focused on finding practical solutions.”

The Legal 500 EMEA, 2024

“Dragana Bajić’s work brings efficiency and clarity to complex employment matters, and clients highly appreciate her contributions to their activities.”

The Legal 500 EMEA, 2024

“Dragana Bajić is very thorough and detailed. All enquiries are resolved promptly. In addition, she demonstrates solid business understanding of clients’ actual needs, with proposals on how to mitigate risks, if any.”

The Legal 500 EMEA, 2023

“Dragana Bajić’s commitment to resolving labour policy issues and advancing the digitalisation of labour documentation sets her apart from competitors.”

The Legal 500 EMEA, 2024

“Dragana Bajić is very thorough and detailed. All enquiries are resolved promptly. In addition, she demonstrates solid business understanding of clients’ actual needs, with proposals on how to mitigate risks, if any.”

The Legal 500 EMEA, 2023

“Dragana Bajić is knowledgable and reliable, and with a positive approach and exceptional communication skills.”

The Legal 500 EMEA, 2023

“Dragana Bajić is knowledgable and reliable, and with a positive approach and exceptional communication skills.”

The Legal 500 EMEA, 2023

Memberships & Roles

  • 2019 – Chair of Labour Regulations Committee, AmCham Serbia (to date)
  • 2018 – Vice Chair of Labour Regulations Committee, AmCham Serbia
  • 2007 – Admitted to the Serbian Bar Association as attorney (to date)
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Education

  • 2007  – Bar exam
  • 2004 - University of Belgrade, Faculty of Law, LL.B. 
more less

Feed

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How political and economic turbulence affects Central and Eastern Europe’s...
With no clear end in sight, the devastating war in Ukraine threatens to divide Europe politically and economically. Countries in the Central, Eastern, and South-Eastern Europe (CESEE) region are right in the middle of this divide, but war on the easternmost fringes of Europe is not the only geopolitical issue multinationals across the region must be aware of. Among frequent flare ups of tensions on the Kosovo-Serbia border, peace and stability is once again far from assured in the Western Balkans (Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo, Montenegro, North Macedonia, and Serbia). With all these countries at some stage of EU accession, two regional integration initiatives (the “Berlin Process” and the “Open Balkan”) are in place to improve regional cooperation, including workforce mobility between Western Balkans countries, and prepare them for membership of the bloc. While Serbia, Albania and North Macedonia are full-fledged members of both initiatives, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, and Kosovo are still reluctant to formally join, even though they participate in some summits. The agreements already signed within the Open Balkan initiative will unify the labour market for member countries, and remove the requirement for work permits or other formalities. The Open Balkan initiative is particularly supported by the US and its Chamber of Commerce offices in the region, as international companies with regional hubs in Serbia are looking forward to having easier access to labour from neighbouring countries. However, even though the framework agreements were signed more than a year ago, not much has been done to implement them. 2023 is expected to be the year that this is finalised. On the other hand, the EU has been slow to come to decisions on expansion. For example, North Macedonia has been a candidate country since 2005. According to analysis by the International Institute for Middle East and Balkan Studies, the indecisiveness of the EU has strategic consequences in the Western Balkans. In particular, there are real dangers that the uncertainty of the EU enlargement process, combined with local popular pressure, could, after many years of waiting, propel some countries to change their geopolitical orientation. This is particularly concerning at a time when Russia, China, Turkey, and other outside countries are seeking to increase their influence in the region.2023 may therefore be another politically turbulent year in the CESEE. This year’s parliamentary and/or presidential elections in Turkey, Greece, Poland, Montenegro, and Bulgaria could trigger further unrest or instability. And all of this could obviously affect the labour market in the region. Employment shortages driving wage inflation The inflation rate is forecast to remain elevated throughout 2023. Minimum wages have re­cently in­creased in most CESEE countries. However, these nominal wage increases do not match the pace of inflation, causing real wages to fall. A predicted economic recession in 2023 is not expected to cause high un­em­ploy­ment, given tight labour market conditions with high vacancy rates. Mass layoffs are expected in technology, media, and telecoms, but mostly impacting companies that over­hired dur­ing the pandemic. At the same time, deep shortages in particular jobs and professions are expected to drive up wages and stimulate the migration of labour – especially skilled labour – between com­pan­ies, and even sectors. For example, the Serbian Ministry of Electronic Communications estimates the country needs 30,000 software developers to meet the planned growth demands of many international companies with R&D hubs or service centres. Talent management is becoming a corporate priority as companies struggle to attract, retain and engage workers. Environmental, social, and governance (ESG) issues are taking centre stage in order to at­tract work­ers, even at a time when companies are navigating unprecedented energy costs and supply chain dis­rup­tions. That’s highly important when employees, especially the “Gen Z”, seek purpose and con­nec­tion with­in their work. Employees are becoming more and more interested in internal mobility and career pro­gres­sion op­por­tun­it­ies, as well as in diverse forms of work and mobile work possibilities. Also, it is important for employers to do some self-in­tro­spec­tion on whether the way they attract talent is truly inclusive, or if employees perceive their leadership style as empathetic. EU emigration continues to hit productivity Workforce shortages are one of the main barriers to growth in the CESEE region. A migration crisis, which has boosted labour supply in Poland and Czechia in particular, has not changed this.A significant part of the EU 2023 Work Programme is focused on facilitating workforce mobility within the bloc and enabling easier access by non-EU nationals to the EU labour market. Given that non-EU countries in the region have struggled for decades with the loss of highly skilled workers to the EU, continued emigration is certain to continue to impact the productivity of non-EU economies. Digital nomad working on the rise Another important trend post-pandemic, and in light of the need to attract skilled labour, is remote working from another country. According to the 2022 Special Eurobarometer on intra-EU labour mobility, almost one-in-five Europeans envisage working outside their own country, and half consider living and working abroad as an important experience with benefits beyond their professional life. Digital nomad visas – which enable foreign citizens to stay and work remotely in their host country for a certain period, usually one year, without paying income taxes or other social contributions in that jurisdiction – are becoming more popular. Several CESEE countries, including Romania, Croatia, Hungary, Czech Republic, Montenegro, and Albania, already issue digital nomad visas. Serbia is planning to adopt relevant regulations this year and North Macedonia is expected to follow soon. More workplace legislation in the pipeline As to other notable legislation in 2023, most EU countries within the CESEE region are planning to implement in full the EU directives on work-life balance and on predictable working conditions. Several countries are also finalising implementation of the Whistleblowing Directive – though Hungary is still falling behind, with no draft laws in place. One novel idea being discussed in Slovenia is a possible shortening of the working week to 30 hours. In Serbia, we finally expect a change in regulation that will introduce a combined residence and work permit and provide a proper legal framework for in­tern­ships. Art­icle first appeared in January 2023 issued by In­ter­na­tion­al Employment Lawyer 
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The Walt Disney Company Limited & Disney DTC EM Limited appoint Petrikić...
The Walt Disney Company, a media and entertainment powerhouse, and Disney DTC EM Limited, have appointed Petrikić & Partners AOD as their data protection representative for their Disney+ streaming service in the Republic of Serbia. Pursuant to Article 44 of the Serbian Law on Personal Data Protection, data controllers that do not have a registered seat in Serbia are required to appoint a representative in Serbia to act as a point of contact for the data protection authority and for data subjects. Since Disney+ streaming service has recently been launched in Serbia, Disney+ customers in Serbia may reach out to Petrikić & Partners AOD for any questions or complaints in relation to the processing of their personal data by the above Walt Disney companies. The appointment of Petrikić & Partners AOD was announced by the Commissioner for Information of Public Importance and Personal Data Protection: Disney DTC EM Limited and The Walt Disney Company Limited designate representative for Republic of Serbia in accordance with Law on Personal Data Protection - Commissioner for Information of Public Importance and Personal Data Protection (poverenik. rs)The contact email address designated for this purpose is datapri­vacy­bel­grade@cms-rrh. com
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With NoFacePls, a legal-tech innovative solution enabling real-time face blurring during live video streaming, CMS Belgrade plans to change the face of privacy protection.
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Summer cocktail party for AmCham Serbia’s Labour Regulations Committee...
Last week, on 1 July 2021, CMS Belgrade was the proud host to the members of AmCham Serbia’s Labour Regulations Committee and HR Forum at a cocktail party to celebrate the successful cooperation and...