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Rome

Italy

A century of rich and long historic records has molded CMS’ identity so that the Firm has not only become synonymous with tradition, integrity and reliability but also with innovation and transformation. Through the technical rigor and strategic expertise of our professionals, we can help your organization thrive in changing times.

We have strengthened our presence to become one of the major legal and tax firms in Italy.  In addition to our strong local roots and excellent reputation in the Italian market, we are also part of CMS and can support you with over 4,500 legal and tax professionals in over forty countries.

We know that the rules governing your business are constantly changing. When you work with CMS in Rome, you will benefit from our hands-on approach, including strong partner involvement in order to guide you through the complexities of the legislation that applies to you.

If you do business in Italy and are looking for legal support, please reach out to us via our online contact form or give us a call.

We structure our business in practice areas and industry sector groups. This enables us to develop a comprehensive understanding of our clients’ businesses and to deliver sound and commercially relevant advice. Our goal is to be not just technical lawyers, but to understand your business and its challenges.

Our experts offer clients in-depth experience in all areas of commercial law, with large Corporate/M&A and Tax teams based in Rome. Our clients range from large multinationals to small and midsize companies in several industry sectors.

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Directions

The Rome Office is 10 minutes (walking distance) from Termini Station.

From the Airport

Fiumicino – Leonardo Da Vinci Airport

The airport is located 32 km from the city.

  • Bus – there are buses outside the terminal building to Termini station (50 min).
  • Taxi – there are taxis outside the terminal building and the journey is approx. 45 minutes.
  • Train –  the Roma-Fiumicino train departs every 15 minutes from the air terminal to Termini station, the journey is approx. 30 minutes.
  • Car –  Take the Autostrada Roma - Aeroporto di Fiumicino till you reach the exit for Via Cristoforo Colombo. Remain on Via Cristoforo Colombo and then Viale delle Terme di Caracalla till you reach Piazza Numa Pompilio. Continue straight ahead on Via Druso then Via della Ferratella in Laterano and Via Merulana. Once you reach Piazza Santa Maria Maggiore, turn left on Via dell’Esquilino and then onto Piazza dell’Esquilino. Turn right on Via Cavour/Piazza dell’Esquilino and enter Via Agostino Depretis.

Ciampino Airport

  • Bus – there are buses outside the air terminal to Termini station, the journey is approx.  1 hour.
  • Taxi – There are taxis outside the air terminal and the journey takes approx. 45/50 minutes.
  • Train – from the airport there are buses every 30 minutes to Ciampino Station (Giovan Battista Pastine), the journey from the airport to Ciampino Station takes five minutes and from this station any train will take you to Termini, the time from Ciampino station to Termini is approx. 15 minutes.
  • Car -  Follow Strada Statale 7 Via Appia Nuova. At the roundabout, take the 4th exit -Via Appia Nuova. Continue onto Piazzale Appio. Continue onto Piazza di Porta S. Giovanni. Continue straight onto Via Emanuele Filiberto. Slight left onto Piazza Vittorio Emanuele II. Piazza Vittorio Emanuele II turns left and becomes Via Carlo Alberto. Via Carlo Alberto turns slightly right and becomes Piazza di Santa Maria Maggiore. Turn left onto Via dell'Esquilino. Continue onto Piazza dell'Esquilino. Turn left onto Via Cavour/Piazza dell'Esquilino. Turn right onto Piazza dell'Esquilino. Continue to Via Agostino Depretis. (45 min)

By train from Roma Termini

The Rome office is located only ten minutes by foot from the Termini Central Station.

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Location

CMS Adonnino Ascoli & Cavasola Scamoni
Via A. Depretis 86
00184 Rome
Italy

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