Home / Asia-Pacific / Singapore
Singapore bridge skyline at night

Singapore

Asia-Pacific

Singapore is a global centre for Asian inbound and outbound trade and investment, acting as a major hub for international arbitration and home to the Asia Pacific Head Offices of many international companies. With almost a decade in the region, we have invested heavily in relationships, using our Singapore base as a seat to help our clients across every key Asia Pacific jurisdiction.

CMS in Singapore is a full service office that services the Asia Pacific region. We advise international and national businesses doing business with, and in, Singapore and Asia. We are one of the few international law firms able to provide businesses with Singapore law advice through our association with Holborn Law. We also have a tried and trusted network of local lawyers in every key Asian jurisdiction and actively manage and review these relationships to make sure we work with the best teams in each jurisdiction.

With effect from 1 September 2017, CMS is pleased to announce a formal law alliance (FLA) between its Singapore office and Singapore law practice Holborn Law LLC. The FLA, which has received approval from the Legal Services Regulatory Authority of Singapore, will operate under the name CMS Holborn Asia.

Our lawyers based in Singapore are qualified across the UK, Singapore, the US, Australia, New Zealand and Malaysia. Many also have native bilingual proficiency in many languages, including Bahasa Malay, French, Japanese, Korean, Mandarin and Tamil. If you do business in or around Singapore, please reach out via our online contact form or give us a call.

Read more Read less

Location

  • Other jurisdictions with experts on
  • Singapore
Go To Desks Singapore

Feed

27/08/2024
Reading the Arbitration Tea Leaves: A Fireside Chat with Leading Asia-Pacific...
Join us at 1880 Members Club for an exclusive Fireside Chat with prominent Asia-Pacific arbitrators, Sapna Jhangiani KC and Professor Benjamin Hughes, moderated by Dr. Mariel Dimsey, Partner at CMS Hong Kong and former Sec­ret­ary-Gen­er­al of the Hong Kong International Arbitration Centre (HKIAC). We'll explore first-hand accounts, dissect pivotal emerging trends, and spotlight the crucial role of diversity and inclusion in this ever-evolving field. The fireside chat will be followed by networking drinks and light canapes. Limited seats are avail­able. Please RSVP as soon as possible to secure a spot. 
25/07/2024
Navigating the ESG Landscape in Asia: Risks, Progress, and Talent
We are delighted to invite you to a seminar on “Nav­ig­at­ing the ESG Landscape in Asia: Risks, Progress, and Talent” co-organised by CMS Singapore and Randstad, on Thursday 25 April 2024 in Singapore. As ESG considerations increasingly influence corporate strategies and regulatory requirements, it is essential for corporate leaders and legal professionals to stay ahead with the latest developments, risks and best practices. Listen, engage and connect with our distinguished panel of leading in-house experts and ESG partners who will provide valuable and practical insights into the following topics: Panellists Moderator: Asya Jamaludin, Partner at CMS Singa­pore Open­ing Remarks: Gerald Licnachan, Partner, CMS Singa­pore Clos­ing remarks: Marc Rathbone, Partner and Head of Energy and Energy Transition (APAC), CMS SingaporeSecure your spot today and click here to RSVP to the event.
15/07/2024
CMS European Private Equity Study 2024
We are pleased to share with you the 2024 edition of the CMS European Private Equity Study, a comprehensive analysis of hundreds of private equity deals CMS advised on across Europe in 2023 and previous...
12/07/2024
Energy and climate change: The most significant (marine) climate change...
Continuing the theme of a number of recent court judgment regarding state and party obligations concerning climate change issues, the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea (“ITLOS”) has recently...
12/07/2024
Specialised investment fund (“SIF”) in Luxembourg
Published on July 12, 2024This Back to Basics note follows our key concepts briefings, which intend to provide high-level insights regarding funds fundamentals, funds vehicles and operational considerations, available here. What is a SIF? The SIF is an investment fund that can invest in all types of assets as permitted under the law of 13 February 2007 (the SIF Law). Following the law of 12 July 2013 on alternative investment fund managers (the AIFM Law), the SIF Law was divided in two parts, with provisions concerning general provisions applicable to all SIFs (Part I of the SIF Law) and specific provisions for SIFs that qualify as alternative investment funds (AIFs) (Part II of the SIF Law). SIFs are funds that are regulated and subject to the prudential supervision of the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (CSSF), the Luxembourg supervisory authority. SIFs must be authorised by the CSSF before commencing their activity and are supervised by the CSSF on an ongoing basis. Key features Eligible investors:SIFs are reserved for “well informed investors”, who are:In­sti­tu­tion­al and professional investors (within the meaning Annex II to Directive 2014/65/EU); or Other investors which have stated in writing that they adhere to the status of well-informed investor and, either (i) invest a minimum of 100,000 Euros in the SIF or (ii) have been the subject of an assessment made by a credit institution, an investment firm or a UCITS management company or an authorised alternative investment fund manager (AIFM) certifying their expertise, experience and knowledge to adequately appraise the contemplated investment in the SIF. Eligible assets:There is no restriction on eligible assets for SIFs. Corporate form and structuration of a SIF:SIFs are open or closed entities which take the form of:Fonds commun de placement (FCP) or common contractual fund, which is a fund without legal personality managed by a Luxembourg management company. Société d’In­ves­t­isse­ment à Capital Variable (SICAV) or investment company with variable capital, in the form of a corporate entity (e.g. SA, SCA, Sàrl) or of a partnership with or without legal personality (SCS or SCSp). SIFs can be formed as single funds or as umbrella structures with an unlimited number of ring-fenced sub-funds. Each sub-fund can have its own investment policy, specific features, governing rules or investment manager. Set up:The SIF may be set up as a partnership, a corporate company or an FCP further to the establishment or incorporation process of such entity (e.g. execution of a LPA, management regulations or incorporation of the company in front of a Luxembourg notary). The SIF must establish an offering document which includes the information necessary for investors to be able to make an informed assessment of the investment and related risks. The service agreements of the mandatory SIF’s service providers (as set out below) must be effective as of the date of its establishment / incorporation.A SIF must be approved by the CSSF and is under its permanent supervision through monthly and annual reporting. The approval triggers the entry of the SIF on the official list of SIFs held by the CSSF. Capital requirements:The net assets of a SIF may not be less than EUR 1,250,000, which must be reached within a period of twenty-four months following the authorisation of the SIF. Only 5% of the capital must be paid up on sub­scrip­tion. Di­ver­si­fic­a­tion:A SIF cannot invest more than 30 % of its assets in securities of the same nature issued by the same issuer. Diversification rules do not apply to:Investments in securities issued or guaranteed by an OECD Member State or its regional or local authorities or by EU, regional or global supranational institutions and bodies; andInvestments in target UCIs that are subject to risk-spreading requirements at least comparable to those applicable to SIFs. SIFs may benefit from an initial ramp-up period to comply with the above risk-spreading rules. Marketing:A SIF only benefits from the European marketing passport to the extent that it falls under the scope of the full regime of the alternative investment fund managers directive (AIFMD). Service providers:SIFs must appoint several service providers, the main ones being as follows:a SIF qualifying as an AIF that is not self-managed and above the AIFMD threshold is required to appoint an authorised AIFM;a depositary having its registered office in Luxembourg or a branch in Luxembourg (if its registered office is in another Member State of the European Union) to ensure the safe keeping of its assets;an authorised independent auditor with appropriate professional experience must audit the annual report; anda central administrator which is located in Luxembourg;a portfolio manager in case of delegation by the AIFM. Tax regime:SIFs are not subject to Luxembourg corporate income tax, municipal business tax and net wealth tax but are subject to an annual subscription tax of 0.01 % on their net assets (calculated and payable on a quarterly basis). Some exemptions from subscription tax apply depending on the investment assets (e.g., assets invested in other Luxembourg UCIs subject to this subscription tax, investment in microfinance institutions and pension fund pooling vehicles). SIFs under the form of a corporate entity are subject to 20% real estate tax on rental income and capital gains realized upon disposal of Luxembourg real estate assets and disposal of interests or units in Luxembourg tax transparent entities or mutual funds holding Luxembourg real estate assets. Distributions made by SIFs are not subject to withholding tax. SIFs established under the form of a corporate entity may benefit from some tax treaties concluded by Luxembourg. Management services rendered to SIFs are exempt from VAT. In brief
12/07/2024
The reserved alternative investment fund (“RAIF”) in Luxembourg - UPDATED
Updated on July 12, 2024This Back to Basics note follows our key concepts briefings, which intend to provide high-level insights regarding funds fundamentals, funds vehicles and operational considerations, available here. What is a RAIF? Luxembourg introduced the RAIF by a law of 23 July 2016 (the RAIF Law). RAIFs are also subject to the law of 12 July 2013 on Alternative Investment Fund Managers (the AIFM Law). RAIFs are considered as semi-regulated funds because they are not subject to the supervision of the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (CSSF), the Luxembourg supervisory authority but still involve the nomination of a duly authorised alternative investment fund manager (AIFM) subject to the AIFM Law. The RAIF regime aims at introducing a model with a less sophisticated process than regulated funds, without a double supervision by the CSSF, which make it more attractive for investment funds and asset management. The Luxembourg regime aligns with the European Union (EU)’s approach, through the Directive on AIFMs (the AIFMD), to focus on management supervision rather than product supervision. Key features Eligible investors:RAIFs are reserved for “well-informed investors”, who are:In­sti­tu­tion­al and professional investors (within the meaning Annex II to Directive 2014/65/EU); or Other investors who have stated in writing that they adhere to the status of well-informed investor and, either (i) invest a minimum of 100,000 Euros in the RAIF or (ii) have been the subject of an assessment made by a credit institution, an investment firm or a UCITS management company or an authorised AIFM certifying their expertise, experience and knowledge to adequately appraise the contemplated investment in the RAIF. Eligible assets:There is no restriction on the eligible assets. A RAIF may state in its constitutive documents that its exclusive purpose is to invest in risk capital, in which case the portfolio is limited to investments in risk cap­it­al. Cor­por­ate form and struc­tur­a­tion:RAIFs are open or closed entities which take the form of:Fonds commun de placement (FCP) or common contractual fund, which is a fund without legal personality managed by a Luxembourg management company; orSociété d’In­ves­t­isse­ment à Capital Variable (SICAV) or investment company with variable capital, in the form of a corporate entity (e.g. SA, SCA, Sàrl) or of a partnership with or without legal personality (SCS or SCSp). RAIF can be formed as a single fund or as an umbrella structure with an unlimited number of ring-fenced sub-funds. Each sub-fund can have its own investment policy, specific features, governing rules or investment manager. Set up:The RAIF may be set up as a partnership, a corporate company or an FCP further to the establishment or incorporation process of such entity (e.g. execution of a LPA, management regulations or incorporation of the company in front of a Luxembourg notary). The RAIF must establish an offering document which includes the information necessary for investors to be able to make an informed assessment of the investment and related risks. The service agreements of the mandatory RAIF’s service providers (as set out below) must be effective as of the date of its establishment / incorporation. The RAIF must be registered on the official list of RAIFs held with the Luxembourg trade and companies register. Capital requirements:The net assets of a RAIF may not be less than EUR 1,250,000, which must be reached within a period of twenty-four months following the entry into force of the management regulations of the FCP or from the incorporation of the SICAV. Only 5% of the capital must be paid up on subscription. Di­ver­si­fic­a­tion:RAIFs are subject to an obligation of diversification. The RAIF Law does not impose diversification rules. In practice, a limitation of 30% of the RAIF gross assets in any single investment is generally applied. RAIFs may benefit from an initial ramp-up period to comply with the above risk-spreading rules. These above diversification requirements do not apply to RAIFs investing solely in “risk capital” investments. Marketing:RAIFs benefit from the European marketing passport provided by the AIFMD to market shares, units or partnership interests across the European Economic Area. Service providers:RAIFs must appoint several service providers, the main ones being as follows:an authorised AIFM. RAIFs cannot be internally managed;a depositary having its registered office in Luxembourg or a branch in Luxembourg (if its registered office is in another Member State of the European Union), to ensure the safe keeping of its assets;an authorised independent auditor with appropriate professional experience which must audit the annual report; a central administrator whose head office must be located in Luxembourg; and a portfolio manager in case of delegation by the AIFM. Tax regime: Default RegimeRAIFs are not subject to corporate income tax, municipal business tax or net wealth tax but are subject to an annual subscription tax of 0.01% on their net assets (calculated and payable on a quarterly basis). Some exemptions from subscription tax apply depending on the investment assets (e.g., assets invested in other Luxembourg UCIs subject to this subscription tax, investment in microfinance institutions and pension fund pooling vehicles). Distributions made by RAIFs are not subject to withholding tax. RAIFs established under a corporate form may benefit from some tax treaties concluded by Luxembourg. RAIF investing in risk capitalThis regime is similar to the SICAR regime. RAIF under a corporate form will be subject to corporate income tax and municipal business tax at the aggregate rate of 24,94% (for Luxembourg-city in 2023) with an exemption available for income and gains derived from (i) transferable securities representing investments in risk capital and (ii) income arising from funds held pending their investment in risk capital (only applicable for a maximum period of twelve months preceding their investment in risk capital and where it can be established that the funds have effectively been invested in risk capital). RAIFs will be exempt from Luxembourg net wealth tax except for the minimum net wealth tax. Dis­tri­bu­tions made by RAIFs are not subject to withholding tax in Lux­em­bourg. RAIFs should have access to the double tax treaties concluded by Lux­em­bourg.  RAIFs under a partnership form are tax transparent and are not subject to corporate income tax, municipal business tax and net wealth tax. Distributions made by RAIFs are not subject to withholding tax. RAIFs should not be entitled to the double tax treaties concluded by Lux­em­bourg. RAIFs under a corporate form are subject to 20% real estate tax on rental income and capital gains realized upon disposal of Luxembourg real estate assets and disposal of interests or units in Luxembourg tax transparent entities or mutual funds holding Luxembourg real estate as­sets. Man­age­ment services rendered to RAIFs are exempt from VAT. Investment management services provided to RAIFs are exempt from VAT.   In Brief:
12/07/2024
Specialised investment fund (“SIF”) in Luxembourg
Published on July 12, 2024This Back to Basics note follows our key concepts briefings, which intend to provide high-level insights regarding funds fundamentals, funds vehicles and operational considerations, available here. What is a SIF? The SIF is an investment fund that can invest in all types of assets as permitted under the law of 13 February 2007 (the SIF Law). Following the law of 12 July 2013 on alternative investment fund managers (the AIFM Law), the SIF Law was divided in two parts, with provisions concerning general provisions applicable to all SIFs (Part I of the SIF Law) and specific provisions for SIFs that qualify as alternative investment funds (AIFs) (Part II of the SIF Law). SIFs are funds that are regulated and subject to the prudential supervision of the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (CSSF), the Luxembourg supervisory authority. SIFs must be authorised by the CSSF before commencing their activity and are supervised by the CSSF on an ongoing basis. Key features Eligible investors:SIFs are reserved for “well informed investors”, who are:In­sti­tu­tion­al and professional investors (within the meaning Annex II to Directive 2014/65/EU); or Other investors which have stated in writing that they adhere to the status of well-informed investor and, either (i) invest a minimum of 100,000 Euros in the SIF or (ii) have been the subject of an assessment made by a credit institution, an investment firm or a UCITS management company or an authorised alternative investment fund manager (AIFM) certifying their expertise, experience and knowledge to adequately appraise the contemplated investment in the SIF. Eligible assets:There is no restriction on eligible assets for SIFs. Corporate form and structuration of a SIF:SIFs are open or closed entities which take the form of:Fonds commun de placement (FCP) or common contractual fund, which is a fund without legal personality managed by a Luxembourg management company. Société d’In­ves­t­isse­ment à Capital Variable (SICAV) or investment company with variable capital, in the form of a corporate entity (e.g. SA, SCA, Sàrl) or of a partnership with or without legal personality (SCS or SCSp). SIFs can be formed as single funds or as umbrella structures with an unlimited number of ring-fenced sub-funds. Each sub-fund can have its own investment policy, specific features, governing rules or investment manager. Set up:The SIF may be set up as a partnership, a corporate company or an FCP further to the establishment or incorporation process of such entity (e.g. execution of a LPA, management regulations or incorporation of the company in front of a Luxembourg notary). The SIF must establish an offering document which includes the information necessary for investors to be able to make an informed assessment of the investment and related risks. The service agreements of the mandatory SIF’s service providers (as set out below) must be effective as of the date of its establishment / incorporation.A SIF must be approved by the CSSF and is under its permanent supervision through monthly and annual reporting. The approval triggers the entry of the SIF on the official list of SIFs held by the CSSF. Capital requirements:The net assets of a SIF may not be less than EUR 1,250,000, which must be reached within a period of twenty-four months following the authorisation of the SIF. Only 5% of the capital must be paid up on sub­scrip­tion. Di­ver­si­fic­a­tion:A SIF cannot invest more than 30 % of its assets in securities of the same nature issued by the same issuer. Diversification rules do not apply to:Investments in securities issued or guaranteed by an OECD Member State or its regional or local authorities or by EU, regional or global supranational institutions and bodies; andInvestments in target UCIs that are subject to risk-spreading requirements at least comparable to those applicable to SIFs. SIFs may benefit from an initial ramp-up period to comply with the above risk-spreading rules. Marketing:A SIF only benefits from the European marketing passport to the extent that it falls under the scope of the full regime of the alternative investment fund managers directive (AIFMD). Service providers:SIFs must appoint several service providers, the main ones being as follows:a SIF qualifying as an AIF that is not self-managed and above the AIFMD threshold is required to appoint an authorised AIFM;a depositary having its registered office in Luxembourg or a branch in Luxembourg (if its registered office is in another Member State of the European Union) to ensure the safe keeping of its assets;an authorised independent auditor with appropriate professional experience must audit the annual report; anda central administrator which is located in Luxembourg;a portfolio manager in case of delegation by the AIFM. Tax regime:SIFs are not subject to Luxembourg corporate income tax, municipal business tax and net wealth tax but are subject to an annual subscription tax of 0.01 % on their net assets (calculated and payable on a quarterly basis). Some exemptions from subscription tax apply depending on the investment assets (e.g., assets invested in other Luxembourg UCIs subject to this subscription tax, investment in microfinance institutions and pension fund pooling vehicles). SIFs under the form of a corporate entity are subject to 20% real estate tax on rental income and capital gains realized upon disposal of Luxembourg real estate assets and disposal of interests or units in Luxembourg tax transparent entities or mutual funds holding Luxembourg real estate assets. Distributions made by SIFs are not subject to withholding tax. SIFs established under the form of a corporate entity may benefit from some tax treaties concluded by Luxembourg. Management services rendered to SIFs are exempt from VAT. In brief
12/07/2024
Unregulated special limited partnership (“SCSp”) in Luxembourg
Published on July 12, 2024This Back to Basics note follows our key concepts briefings, which intend to provide high-level insights regarding funds fundamentals, funds vehicles and operational considerations, available here. What is a SCSp? The Luxembourg special limited partnership (société en commandite spéciale – SCSp) is a fund structure introduced in 2013 following the adoption of the law of 12 July 2013 on alternative investment fund managers (the AIFM Law). The SCSp differs from the common limited partnership (société en commandite simple - SCS) notably by the fact that it does not have legal personality. SCSps are subject to the law of 10 august 1915 on commercial compagnies (the 1915 Law) and to the AIFM Law to the extent that it qualifies as an alternative investment fund (AIF). It can in addition be subject to a product regime when used for a regulated fund vehicle (Part II UCI, SIF, SICAR or RAIF). Key features Eligible investors:There is no restriction on eligible investors for unregulated SCSps. Eligible assets:There is no restriction on eligible assets for an unregulated SCSp. Struc­tur­a­tion:SC­Sps are open or closed entities. They can only be formed as a single fund (umbrella structure not available). Set up:An SCSp is formed, for a limited or unlimited duration, by one or more partners with unlimited and joint and several liability for all the obligations of the partnership, and one or more limited partners who only contribute a specific amount constituting partnership interests which may but need not be represented by instruments, as provided in the partnership agreement. The fund is set up by means of a limited partnership agreement which can be made by private or public deed and offers a large flexibility on the set up. All Luxembourg SCSps must maintain a register of the partners. This register must be accessible to any partner, unless the limited partnership agreement disposes otherwise. Capital re­quire­ments:There is no minimum capital requirement for SCSps. Liability of partners:General partners (associés commandités) have unlimited joint and several liability for the obligations of the SCSp, whereas limited partners (associés commanditaires) are only liable up to the amount of their respective contributions or commitments. Limited partners are prohibited from carrying out any act of management vis-à-vis third parties. The general partner may act both as general partner (associé commandité) and manager (gérant) of the SCSp, hence being considered as managing general partner (associé commandité - gérant) and therefore also being held liable in its capacity as manager. Di­ver­si­fic­a­tion:There are no diversification requirements for unregulated SCSps. Marketing:An SCSp only benefits from the European marketing passport to the extent that it falls under the scope of the full regime of the alternative investment fund managers directive (AIFMD). Service providers: To the extent that the SCSp qualifies as an AIF that is not self-managed and above the AIFMD threshold, the following service providers are required:an authorised AIFM;a depositary having its registered office in Luxembourg or a branch in Luxembourg (if its registered office is in another Member State of the European Union), to ensure the safe keeping of its assets;an authorised independent auditor with appropriate professional experience to audit the annual report;a central administrator which is located in Luxembourg;a portfolio manager in case of delegation by the AIFM. Tax regime: An SCSp is tax transparent for corporate income tax and net wealth tax purposes. An SCSp qualifying as AIF is not subject to municipal business tax since it is not a business enterprise carrying out a commercial activity. The SCSp will however be deemed to be a business enterprise if its general partner is a capital company holding 5% or more of its partnership interests. Distributions made by an SCSp are not subject to Luxembourg withholding tax. An SCSp is generally not entitled to double tax treaties concluded by Luxembourg. The VAT status of an SCSp will depend on the activities performed. Main advantages of an SCSp:The main advantages for choosing the SCSp are, inter alia, that:it is internationally recognised and resembles the Anglo-Saxon limited partnership structures;it offers a high level of contractual flexibility and most of the rules can be freely determined in the partnership agreement, as there are very few compulsory provisions in the 1915 Law;it can be easily and rapidly set up and is subject to very limited registration formalities, allowing short time to market;it is not subject to CSSF authorisation or prudential supervision;it is tax transparent from a corporate and tax perspective;it offers confidentiality, as the information published on the Luxembourg Trade and Companies Register is limited to key provisions and does not include the identity of the limited partners nor their contributions; andit is not subject to any minimum capital requirement or minimum investment amount.
12/07/2024
EU’s AI Act published in Official Journal, transition periods now known
Following the adoption of the "Regulation laying down harmonised rules on Artificial Intelligence" (AI Act) by the European Parliament and the Council of the European Union, this act was published in...
12/07/2024
CMS Expert Guide to International Arbitration
We live in a connected global environment where the number and complexity of international transactions is ever increasing.  As a consequence, the policies and activities in one area of the world can...
11/07/2024
Space exploration: what goes up, must come down
BackgroundThe space economy is predicted to be worth a staggering $1.4 trillion by 2030.1 This exponential growth can be largely attributed to the new private “space race” dominated by the world’s...
11/07/2024
Annual Review of Singapore Construction Law Developments
We are pleased to announce the publication of the 2023 edition of our Annual Review of Singapore Construction Law Developments. Now in its third year, the Annual Review summarises key developments in Singapore law that would be of relevance and have an impact on projects governed by Singapore law, over the previous calendar year. The publication has been prepared with our international clients in mind and aims to provide a greater degree of background and analysis than our regular Law-Now alert service. This year’s edition includes articles on the formation and the interpretation of contracts, and non-assignment clauses which are prevalent in standard form construction contracts. We also report on developments in relation to the adjudication, arbitration and dispute resolution regime in Singapore which are important topics in the construction industry. You can download a PDF version of the 2023 annual review below at the bottom of the page. Previous annual reviews are included below:Annual Review of Singapore Construction Law Developments 2022Annual Review of Singapore Construction Law Developments 2021