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The Verdict

20/06/2014

This edition of The Verdict focuses on deferred prosecution agreements.

In February 2014, UK prosecutors (including the Serious Fraud Office – SFO) were given a new tool to combat corporate crime: deferred prosecution agreements (DPAs).

DPAs are judge-approved agreements negotiated by a prosecutor with a corporate defendant, under which the defendant avoids a criminal conviction for specified offences by agreeing to certain terms (which are published) and complying with them during the life of the agreement.

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Authors

Picture of Arkadiusz Korzeniewski
Arkadiusz Korzeniewski
Partner
Warsaw
Picture of Marco Lacaita
Marco Lacaita
Picture of Peter Huber
Peter Huber
Partner
Vienna
Picture of Jean-François Goffin
Jean-François Goffin
Partner
Brussels
Picture of Nedzida Salihovic-Whalen
Nedžida Salihović-Whalen
Partner
Sarajevo
Picture of Ted Rhodes
Ted Rhodes
Partner
Rio de Janeiro
Picture of Atanas Bangachev
Atanas Bangachev
Partner
Sofia
Picture of Ulrike Glueck
Dr. Ulrike Glueck
Managing Partner
Shanghai
Picture of Nick Beckett
Nick Beckett
Managing Partner
Beijing
Picture of Gregor Famira
Gregor Famira
Partner
Vienna
Picture of Tomas Matejovsky
Tomáš Matĕjovský
Partner
Prague
Picture of Stephanie de Giovanni
Stéphanie de Giovanni
Harald W Potinecke
Dr. Harald W Potinecke
Partner
Munich
Picture of Zsolt Okanyi
Dr. Zsolt Okányi
Partner
Budapest
Picture of Emilio Battaglia
Emilio Battaglia
Partner
Rome
Dian Brouwer
Dian Brouwer
Joaquim Shearman de Macedo
Joaquim Shearman de Macedo
Partner
Lisbon
Yuryev Sergey
Sergey Yuryev
Partner
Moscow
Milica-Popovic-CMS-MN
Milica Popović
Partner
Belgrade
Picture of Carlos Aguilar
Carlos Aguilar
Partner
Madrid
Photo of Bernhard Lötscher
Bernhard Lötscher
Partner
Zurich
Picture of Olexander Martinenko
Olexander Martinenko
Senior Partner
Kyiv (CMS CMNO)
Maria-Orlyk-CMS-UA
Maria Orlyk
Partner
Kyiv (CMS RRH)
Picture of Omar Qureshi
Omar Qureshi
Partner
London
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