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Waste management in CEE

Authors

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Thomas Heidemann
Dr. Thomas Heidemann
Partner
Rechtsanwalt
Moscow
Natália Jánošková
Natália Jánošková
Associate
Bratislava
Dusan Bosiljanov
Dusan Bosiljanov
Attorney-at-Law for Energy and Employment
Skopje
Marija Filipovska
Marija Filipovska
Partner
Skopje
Ana Terzić
Ana Terzić
Senior Associate
Sarajevo
Dmitry Bogdanov
Dmitry Bogdanov
Senior Associate
Lawyer
Moscow
Döne Yalçın
Döne Yalçın
Managing Partner Turkey
Istanbul
Agnieszka Skorupińska
Agnieszka Skorupińska
Partner
Warsaw

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Expertise

Modern consumer societies generate significant amounts of waste. The development and implementation of concepts for the treatment of this waste is a central task of infrastructure policy for them.

When, in the 1990s, the first Western European companies began to seriously grapple with issues of waste management and waste reduction, Eastern Europe passed through the state of upheaval. The socialist economic model clashed; the western model started its way to establishment, and the amount of waste promptly increased, albeit without being managed. Waste was simply dumped.

As time progressed, an awareness of the problem has arisen in the Eastern Europe as well. The need for the systematic management of waste is acknowledged everywhere, not least because of pressure from social groups who use protests to point out existing problems and failures. The possible solutions are diverse. In some cases, EU requirements are being implemented and transposed into national law; in some cases, independent concepts are being developed. Russia, for example, has launched a comprehensive and ambitious waste reform.

What all the concepts have in common is that they create a considerable need for investment. When waste is no longer simply dumped, it has to be separated, recycled, processed or destroyed. The techniques required for this often have to be purchased abroad. In many cases, the know-how for the operation of disposal concepts is not available locally either. In this respect, there are many opportunities for western companies in the industry to get involved.

waste, CMS

CMS CEE German Desk – our group of German-speaking lawyers in Eastern Europe – has used the topic described as an opportunity to present and analyse the legal framework for waste management across countries. The result is a multifaceted picture of the possibilities of getting involved in this sector, which, however, also reveals the weak points of the various systems and thus points out risks.

In addition to general country information, the following factsheets provide concise insights into waste volumes, disposal routes and the existing recycling and disposal infrastructure. The main market participants are named. In addition, the legal framework is summarised, and business opportunities are identified. Factsheets on further countries in the region are planned.

This brochure is a compilation of articles on the topic of waste management in Central and Eastern Europe. It is available also in the German language. The presentation is neither encyclopaedic nor comprehensive.

Our authors, who are all active in the field, are happy to answer any further questions you may have.

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Waste management in CEE
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